46 - Do you do? Yeah, I do. Wow, he do.

Have you been crying all morning because Japanese grammar is oh-so-hurts-your-heart hard?

Well cheer up, baby.

Because in casual Japanese, we don't need no hoity–toity razzmatazz.

Allow me to elucidate, ください...

Imagine we have three people...

...or, uh, animals...

Specifically, we have:


Person A:



Person B:



Person C:

You may have picked this up already, just looking at those photos, but yeah:

★ ★ In casual Japanese, you can: ★ ★
1) Ask a question just by saying VERB? (<--Person A)
2) Answer that question by saying VERB. (<--Person B)
3) Report someone's answer (#2) by saying ANSWER って. (<--Person A)
4) Show that you are surprised and/or interested in that answer by saying ANSWER んだ. (<-- Person C)

Simple examples galore...


Is Raccoon going to the party?!

A:

パーティー行く?
paatii iku?
You going to the party?
(Literally: "party + go?")

B:

行く。
iku
Yeah, I am.
(Literally: "go.")

A:

行くって。
iku tte
He said he's gonna go.
(Literally: "go + って")

C:

行くんだ。
iku n da.
So he is going to the party.
(Literally: "go + んだ")

(Note: The nuance is that Panda is surprised and/or interested to learn that Raccoon is going to the party... like maybe he didn't expect Raccoon to go. By the way, the nuance is that Panda will not be going to the party. If he were going, we could have said 来るんだ [kuru nda], "So he is coming to the party.")


Will Raccoon eat some cake?!

A:

ケーキ食べる?
keeki taberu?
Do you want some cake?
(Literally: "cake + eat?")

B:

食べる食べる。
taberu taberu
Yeah, definitely.
(Literally: "eat + eat")

(Note: By saying 食べる twice [rather quickly, mind you] makes it sounds like he is happy and or excited to eat some cake.)

A:

食べるって。
taberu tte
He said he'll have some (cake).
(Literally: "eat + って")

C:

食べるんだ。
taberu n da.
So he will eat some cake, then.
(Literally: "eat + んだ")


Does Raccoon like to dance?!

A:

ダンス好き?
dansu suki?
Do you like dancing?
(Literally: "dancing + liking?")

B:

好き。
suki.
Yeah.
(Literally: "liking.")

A:

好きだって。
suki da tte.
He said he likes dancing.
(Literally: "liking + って")

(Note: 好き is a na-adjective, not a verb, so we add だ, saying 好きだって.)

C:

好きなんだ。
suki nan da.
Ah, so he likes dancing.
(Literally: "liking + なんだ")

(Note: 好き is a na-adjective, not a verb, so we add な, saying 好きなんだ.)


Does Raccoon know who AKB48 is?!

A:

AKB48知ってる?
ee kee bii footiieito shitteru?
Do you know AKB 48?
(Literally: "AKB 48 + knowing?")

B:

知ってる。
shitteru.
Yeah, I do.
(Literally: "knowing.")

A:

知ってるって。
shitteru tte.
He said he knows them.
(Literally: "knowing + って")

C:

知ってるんだ。
shitteru n da.
So he does know them.
(Literally: "knowing + んだ")


Does Raccoon read the newspaper?!

A:


新聞読む?
shinbun yomu?
Do you read the newspaper.
(Literally: "newspaper + read?")

B:

読む。
yomu.
Yeah, I do.
(Literally: "read.")

A:

読むって。
yomu tte.
He says he reads the newspaper.
(Literally: "read + って")

C:

読むんだ。
yomu n da.
Ah, so he reads the newspaper.
(Literally: "read + んだ")


Can Raccoon speak Japanese?!

A:

日本語出来る?
nihongo dekiru?
Can you speak Japanese?
(Literally: "Japanese + can?")

B:

出来る。
dekiru.
Yeah, I can.
(Literally: "can.")

A:

出来るって。
dekiru tte.
He said he speaks Japanese.
(Literally: "can + って")

C:

出来るんだ。
dekiru n da.
So he can speak Japanese, then.
(Literally: "can + んだ")


Wow, man.

Raccoon does like everything.

Jokes aside, though, I hope this helps you build up a bit more courage for diving into some casual Japanese conversations ^_^

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