Ep. 11 Commentary - Last Order


Dialogue

店員:

失礼します。
しつれい します。
Excuse me.

ラストオーダーのお時間です。
ラストオーダー の おじかん です。
This is the last call for drinks.

ご注文はございますか?
ごちゅうもん は ございます か?
Would you like to order anything?

ディエゴ:

俺は大丈夫だけど...みんなは?
おれ は だいじょうぶ だけど... みんな は?
I’m OK… how about everybody else?

カナコ:

もう移動しようよ。
もう いどう しよう よ。
Let’s go somewhere new.

トビ:

いいね。
Nice.

ディエゴ:

二件目はどこにしようか。
にけんめ は どこ に しよう か。
Where should we go?

ミキ:

カラオケ行こうよ!
カラオケ いこう よ!
Let’s go to karaoke!

マナミ:

みんな元気だね。
みんな げんき だ ね。
Everyone seems to be having a good time.

トビ:

そうだね。
Yeah, they do.

二次会行く?
にじかい いく?
Are you gonna come to the next place?

マナミ:

どうしよう。
I’m still thinking about it.

トビ:

行こうよ。
いこう よ。
You should come.

まだ早いし。
まだ はやい し。
It’s still early.

マナミ:

じゃあ...行く!
じゃあ...いく!
Hmm… OK!

カナコ:

ケンタ君も行く?
ケンタくん も いく?
Are you joining, too?

ケンタ:

うん。
Yeah.

ディエゴ:

みんな来るみたいだね。
みんな くる みたい だ ね。
Looks like everyone’s joining.

ミキ:

やった!
Yay!


Commentary Transcript

Okay, okay, okay, let’s get us some Japanese.

We’ve seen this first line before…

店員:

失礼します。
しつれい します。
Excuse me.

Remember what it means? Well, technically it means “I’m behaving rudely,” but we can just say “Excuse me,” and it’s the phrase of choice if you’re ever planning on barging into a room. Here it is repeated four times: [insert track]

Once the server gets in the room, she says…

店員:

ラストオーダーのお時間です。
ラストオーダー の おじかん です。
This is the last call for drinks.

  • Last order
  • Time
  • is

Sometimes Japanese is just too easy. This word here ラストオーダー is, literally, “last order.” And then we have “のお時間です.” So the server is literally saying “It’s last order time.” I translated it to, “This is the last call for drinks.” You may recall that the group is enjoying a 飲(の)み放題(ほうだい), an all-you-can-drink plan, and usually the server will come in exactly 30 minutes before it ends to take your last order, your last chance to get some more booze without paying more money.

She clarifies this by saying…

店員:

ご注文はございますか?
ごちゅうもん は ございます か?
Would you like to order anything?

  • (honorable) order
  • [topic]
  • Is (honorific)?

注文 means “order,” and ご注文, means something like “honorable order” (as if anyone would ever say that in English). We’ve seen ご注文 before, if you recall, from the first time when this server came into the room and took orders saying :

ご注文はお決まりですか?
ごちゅうもん は おきまり です か?

“Are you ready to order?”

Well, the phrase in this dialogue is really similar, too. Only this time, it’s getting translated to “Would you like to order anything?” The main difference this time is ございます, which is the honorific form of あります, which usually means “to be,” but can also mean “to have; to exist.” So by saying ございますか it’s kind of like asking “Do you have~?” or “Do ~ exist?” And since we’re talking about orders, here, ご注文, a direct translation would be “Do you have orders?” (said in a super polite way). In other words, “Would you like to order anything?”

ございます is a super common word in Japanese. You don’t really need to be able to speak honorific or humble Japanese (i.e. mega-polite Japanese), but is really helpful being able to understand it. The other form of ございます that you’re likely to see is でございます, which is the mega-formal form of です. This makes sense, if we think about how ございます means あります, because である is a (usually written) way of saying です.

For example, here is the same exact sentence with different levels of formality:

彼(かれ)は先生(せんせい)だ / He’s a teacher. (casual)

彼は先生です / He is a teacher. (formal)

彼は先生である / He is a teacher. (written Japanese)

彼は先生ございます / He is a teacher. (super formal, honorific)

Don’t fret about formality, though. Just fret about understanding. And we can now understand that ございます means あります and でございます means です.

Diego responds by turning to his friends and saying…

ディエゴ:

俺は大丈夫だけど...みんなは?
おれ は だいじょうぶ だけど... みんな は?
I’m OK… how about everybody else?

  • I
  • [topic]
  • OK
  • Is
  • But
  • Everyone
  • [topic]?

We’ve seen all of the elements of this sentence before. 俺は大丈夫だけど, “I’m OK, but…” みんなは?, literally, “Everyone?” Translated in the dialogue as “How about everyone else?”

Then Kanako says…

カナコ:

もう移動しようよ。
もう いどう しよう よ。
Let’s go somewhere new.

  • Already
  • Move
  • Let’s do
  • [assertion]

The only word we’ve never seen here is 移動. Usually you’ll see this with する, where 移動する gets translated to “to move.” But it’s more so “move” in the sense of “move from [place A] to [place B], kind of like the English words “to transport” or “to transfer.” So when Kanako says 移動しよう, “let’s move,” it’s “let’s move” in the sense of “let’s move from this place to a new place,” and in the dialogue I translated this to “Let’s go somewhere new.”

You might think that the word もう, which means “already” is getting left out of this translation, but actually we just don’t need it in the translation. The reason that Kanako includes it in this sentence is that she thinks they should move to a new place right away, without ordering a last drink. I suppose I could have translated the whole thing as “Let’s go somewhere new now,” but that didn’t seem as natural to me.

Toby then says.

トビ:

いいね。
Nice.

  • Good
  • [you feel me?]

I translated this to “Nice.”

Then Diego says…

ディエゴ:

二件目はどこにしようか。
にけんめ は どこ に しよう か。
Where should we go?

  • Second place
  • [topic]
  • Where
  • Decide on?

二件目 literally means something like “second building,” but we can just think of it as “second (drinking) place.

Then we have どこ, meaning where, and then にしようか?

We’ve seen にする before as (sometimes) meaning “decide on,” this time in the form of 〜にしようか, literally “shall we?” So if we literally translated the whole thing it would be “Where shall we go?” But I just translated it it to “Where should we go?”

I should point out that saying 〜しよう is a lot different than saying 〜しようか.

For example, earlier Kanako said 移動しよう, and we translated it as “Let’s go somewhere new.” However, if she had said 移動しようか, then it would not have been a suggestion, but rather a question, and we would have translated it as “Shall we go somewhere new?” or “Want to go somewhere new?”

I was planning to just not even say anyting about this here, but if Diego had said 二件目はどこにしよう, then it would have sounded like he was asking himself: “I wonder where we should go next?” Because, when we have question words, plus the volitinal form, such as しよう, then it sounds like the speaker is asking themselves, unsure of what to do or think. That might sound confusing, but we’re actually going to see another example of this later in this dialogue, so I’ll explain more then.

Miki then jumps in saying…

ミキ:

カラオケ行こうよ!
カラオケ いこう よ!
Let’s go to karaoke!

  • Karaoke
  • Let’s go
  • [assertion]

This one is pretty straightforward, and I translated it to “Let’s go to karaoke!”

The video then pans over to Toby and Manami, and Manami says…

マナミ:

みんな元気だね。
みんな げんき だ ね。
Everyone seems to be having a good time.

  • Everyone
  • Lively
  • Is
  • [huh]

I’m not even going to try to explain what 元気 means in English, because I have no idea. Weird, literal translations of this could range from “Everyone is lively, huh?” to “Everyone is healthy, huh?” But I just translated it to “Everyone seems to be having a good time.”

This line, said in this situation, is kind of similar to the phrase 盛(も)り上(あ)がってるね, which we saw in a previous video.

Toby then responds with a pretty much meaningless sentence, saying…

トビ:

そうだね。
Yeah, they do.

This could be something like, “Yes, that’s true, isn’t it?” But I just translated it to “Yeah, they do.” As in, “Yeah, they do seem to be having a good time.”

He then continues by asking…

トビ:

二次会行く?
にじかい いく?
Are you gonna come to the next place?

  • Second meeting
  • Go?

We already saw 二件目 before. Well 二次会 is pretty much the same thing. Only, this time it doesn’t mean (literally) means “second building” but rather “second meeting.”

When I first heard this track from the voice actor for Toby, I thought that it sounded strange the way that the い at the end of 二次会 and the い at the beginning of 行く kind of melted together. But then I checked with a few Japanese people, and they all thought that it sounded totally natural. So obviously I was wrong in thinking that this sounds strange. You think it sounds normal? Here’s the dialouge track repeated a few times: [insert track].

Toby is literally saying “Second place, go?” But I translated it to “Are you gonna come to the next place?”

Then Manami says…

マナミ:

どうしよう。
I’m still thinking about it.

Here we have what I was explaining earlier: Question Word Plus Volitional, which indicates that the speaker is asking themselves a question that they are not sure the answer to.

If we translated this literally, it would be どう, “how,” and しよう “let’s do,” but together we can think of it as “What should I do?” Or even, more literally, “How should I do?”

Like I said before, this construction is possible for a variety of situations. For example…

どこに行(い)こう, “I wonder where I should go.”

なに食(た)べよう, “I wonder what I should eat.”

The thing is, though, that どうしよう is the most common version of this construction. So common, actually, that you’re likely to see people teaching it as a set phrase. どうしよう, “What should I do?” Or if we said it in a more urgent, panicked tone, どうしよう, it sounds like “I don’t know what to do.”

When Toby asked Manami 【二次会行く?】 “Are you gonna come to the next place?” She responded with [どうしよう], translated in the dialogue as “I’m still thinking about it,” or we could also say “I don’t know yet.”

Then Toby, who is clearly very interested in spending more time with Manami, says…

トビ

行こうよ。
いこう よ。
You should come.

This is literally, “Let’s go [assertion],” and I translated it to “You should come.”

He then adds…

トビ:

まだ早いし。
まだ はやい し。
It’s still early.

  • Still
  • Early
  • [reasons, among others]

I’m pretty sure we’ve seen everything here. A literal translation of the whole thing might be “Because it’s still early (among other reasons).” I translated it in the dialogue to “It’s still early.”

Then Manami says…

マナミ:

じゃあ...行く!
じゃあ...いく!
Hmm… OK!

  • Well then
  • Go!

I translated this to “Hmm… OK!” Or I could have also put, more literally, “Then… I’ll go!”

We then get a look at Kanako and Kenta’s conversation, which starts with Kanako saying…

カナコ:

ケンタ君も行く?
ケンタくん も いく?
Are you joining, too?

  • Kenta-kun
  • Also
  • Go?

In the dialogue: “Are you joining, too?” Or I could have put, “Are you going, too?”

And Kenta says…

ケンタ:

うん。
Yeah.

  • Yeah

And then Diego says to Miki…

ディエゴ:

みんな来るみたいだね。
みんな くる みたい だ ね。
Looks like everyone’s joining.

  • Everyone
  • Come
  • Looks like
  • Is
  • Huh?

So we’ve seen all of this before. In particular, I want to look at the word みたい here. The translation that I used was “Looks like everyone’s joining,” which is pretty literal. Even more literal would have been “Looks like everyone’s coming.”

Be careful here. Because it would also be correct, technically, to drop the だ in this sentence and make it みんな来るみたいね. However, removing だ would make this feminine language, which would sound strange for Toby to use. So girls can say 〜みたいね but guys should always say みたいだね

Now, to make things even more confusing, guys and girls should both leave out だ in sentences that don’t have ね at the end. So, for guys or girls, みんな来るみたい is okay. In that case, the nuance would just be “It looks like everyone is joining.” Although without ね it doesn’t really sound like Diego is hoping for Miki to respond or comment to this, he is just informing her that it looks like everyone is coming.

Diego expresses interest in Miki’s response to this situation, though, and that’s why he adds ね. And because he adds ね, being a guy, he needs to also add だ: [みんな来るみたいだね] “Looks like everyone is joining.” And then Miki responds with a line that she also used in the last dialogue:

ミキ:

やった!
Yay!

“Yes!”

“Yay!”

“Score!”

“Great!”

That’s all for this video. See you next time!


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